Into the Woods

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In recent weeks, Phillip and I noticed–in ourselves and friends–a kind of bone-weariness and increasingly short fuses in dealing with confinement, with the government’s ineptitude, with community members who will never comply with recommended (or mandated) best practices, and with the stress and fear of enduring walls around our lives, options, and hopes for possibly as long as we live…It’s not that we want to go “back to normal,” but forward would be nice.

Seeing and embracing loved ones would be nice. Getting lost in a crowd of strangers would be nice. A movie, or a restaurant would be nice. Not having to think through every single step required to get some groceries would be nice. It’s felt like an increasingly cruel burden to be constantly vigilant and following all the correct steps prescribed for our safety. But we have no acceptable alternative.

We’re experiencing a combustion of frustration that Must. Be. Tolerated. There is no other rational choice, until the virus and its treatment are managed, until we’d have better than a fighting chance to survive it. Some days, I want to stand in the yard and scream.

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So, yes: grief, anger, cranky pants, pissy moods, rolled eyes, deep sighs.

And not exclusively, of course; the weather’s been gorgeous; the gardens are yielding blossoms and food; we, the 4-leggeds, and our loved ones are safe and well, and we’re both blessed with creative outlets.

And yet. The “we can do this” holiday spirit we wore like leis as we entered quarantine wilted, dried, and blew away rather quickly. We became less flexible, and seemed to jettison our joy in the need for the stability of a schedule to reliably follow as our isolation progressed. And that’s understandable, since, with this virus, we were walking into the darkening woods without a map.

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Life became scarier and the bad news seemed to increase daily, so we put energy into organizing our days, something we could control. Living with 8 other dependent mammals has always created a fairly predictable schedule, but we’ve been clinging too tenaciously to it out of our own need to keep occupied and avoid staring into the abyss of “what if’s.”

Happily, really, we’re feeling stronger and ready to let go of the rigidity we needed to feel secure on our journey through the woods. And I think both our weariness and crankiness signaled this…We’re rebelling against confinement, yes, but also against the tightness with which we’ve been enduring it. We’re finding our way back to lightness and balance, and discovering ways to tend and feed our joy.

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I’ve begun to check in more consciously with my breathing, because I tend to tighten and to hold my breath when I feel stressed. Now, throughout the day, I practice one of the many breathing exercises I’ve collected for years. Funny, how collecting them hasn’t worked nearly as well as doing them every day.

We relax together every afternoon, and we’re giving ourselves more dedicated reading time than just the half hour before bedtime. (I finally finished the almost-800 page The Mirror and the Light, the last in the Cromwell trilogy by Hilary Mantel, and I feel like I’ve disembarked from a time machine. What another stunning stay in Tudor England, floating in Mantel’s glorious language.) We’ve always eaten healthy food, but we’re having more fun planning our meals together. We take naps if and when we want, and watch old movies in the middle of the day if we feel like it. One day, I jumped back in bed for hours and read the day away. And it is pure joy for me to see Phillip relax, which has reminded me that caring for ourselves can also provide peace to those with whom we’re in relationship.

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And daily, I’m lugging my cameras along on a walk. This morning, I even went on an unexpected adventure. I strolled down to the bridge to visit my heron buddy, then returned and followed the trail from our yard towards the neighbor’s woods. For 25 years, this primitive trail has run along our properties, beside the river, and then branches into another trail down to the riverbank, where I thought I might get a better shot of the heron.

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But the pandemic has kept both us and our neighbor from maintaining our rudimentary paths, and I rather quickly found myself struggling with fallen limbs, colonies of jewelweed rising over my head, and a kabillion burr-sticker-prickles. Damn. I thought I could go towards the neighbor’s and get through the tangle of vegetation; I couldn’t. I turned right, into the woods, thinking the forest floor would be cleaner; it wasn’t. I stood in the woods, surrounded by branches, grasses, vines, and weeds, and I panicked for a moment. I am short and small, and the woods are thick and tall…but they’re not wide, and I knew the way home, so I began to crawl, burrow, jump over branches, slide through openings, and push towards home. I could hear the dogs and Phillip in the dogpark, but I couldn’t see them or figure out quite how to get there. I have a new appreciation for all that Mother Nature can accomplish in 6 months.

As I scrambled through the last barrier to our yard, the dogs sent up a raucous welcome and Phillip, rather surprised at seeing a Green Woman emerge from the woods, stared, transfixed for a moment, and then crossed to the dogpark gate to meet me. As I recounted my adventure, we both started to laugh and couldn’t stop. Of course, he thought it was absolutely necessary to get a photo. I will never get all these burrs out of my clothes, but I had a sweet little adventure. Into the woods and out again.

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And it ended in joy.

And here is another gift of joy in my week. The Basque choral composer and  director, Javier Busto, created a setting for In the Time of Pandemic and then gathered a virtual choir of artists from all over the world to record it…it’s beautiful. I hope it brings you joy!

The picture book version of And the People Stayed Home is also available, for pre-order, at these locations. I think it is a joyful book, a book of hope, and I believe it can be our story in more ways than we imagine.

https://andthepeoplestayedhomebook.com/

Peace to your week!

© Copyright of all visual and written materials on The Daily Round belongs solely to Catherine M. O’Meara, 2011-Present. Unauthorized use is strictly prohibited, without the author’s written approval. No one is authorized to use Catherine O’Meara’s copyrighted material for material gain without the author’s engagement and written permission. All other visual, written, and linked materials are credited to their authors. Thank you, and gentle peace.

6 thoughts on “Into the Woods

  1. Dear Kitty. I send you my love from Argentina. Its me Carolina Deger. I realized you are no longer on IG. I loved the pictures of nature you posted and of your four legged friends. Did I do something wrong for you to leave? I deleted the translation of your poem if that was an issue… I let you know that I looked for no gain at all. I decided my translation was not good enough when I saw you were gone.. and deleted it. I hope to see you again on IG and your four legged friends, they do save us… my two cats send you all lots of love as well. We endure. Let me know what was wrong. I also take breaks from IG as well sometimes. I know some posts we are forced to see on IG are annoying ha ha. It’s not like Facebook where we can remain friends but never see posts (one reason why I left Facebook) I was posting to no one. Can I follow you? You don’t have to follow me. Nothing interesting to see I know! Now I am using IG stories. People seem to get less annoyed and I keep in touch with them there. Right now only 26 people follow me ha ha. But I try not to let an app tell me how unpopular I am, and lonely ha ha, which makes me stronger against the isolation anyway. I also realized I post for myself mostly, to keep a record of happy moments by saving stories. People seem to care less and less about human beings. I sometimes look into my cats eyes and see all that is worth stepping out of bed for. I send you my love. I remember when I read your poem how it felt. The warmth in my hearth, the hope… in the middle of the isolation, when I realized I had been isolated long before, as well as many… Thank you.

  2. Dear Kitty. I send you my love from Argentina. Its me Carolina Deger. I realized you are no longer on IG. I loved the pictures of nature you posted and of your four legged friends. Did I do something wrong for you to leave? I deleted the translation of your poem if that was an issue… I let you know that I looked for no gain at all. I decided my translation was not good enough when I saw you were gone.. and deleted it. I hope to see you again on IG and your four legged friends, they do save us… my two cats send you all lots of love as well. We endure. Let me know what was wrong. I also take breaks from IG as well sometimes. I know some posts we are forced to see on IG are annoying ha ha. It’s not like Facebook where we can remain friends but never see posts (one reason why I left Facebook) I was posting to no one. Can I follow you? You don’t have to follow me. Nothing interesting to see I know! Now I am using IG stories. People seem to get less annoyed and I keep in touch with them there. Right now only 26 people follow me ha ha. But I try not to let an app tell me how unpopular I am, and lonely ha ha, which makes me stronger against the isolation anyway. I also realized I post for myself mostly, to keep a record of happy moments by saving stories. People seem to care less and less about human beings. I sometimes look into my cats eyes and see all that is worth stepping out of bed for. I send you my love. I remember when I read your poem how it felt. The warmth in my hearth, the hope… in the middle of the isolation, when I realized I had been isolated long before, as well as many… Thank you.

    1. Dear Carolina,
      Thank you for your concern and kind words. I sent you an e-mail to explain, too, but to summarize: I closed my Instagram for security reasons and because I just don’t have time to really master it. The decision had nothing at all to do with anyone I followed or who followed me; it just didn’t feel safe, and I also don’t have time to manipulate all these online social media sites, if I want time for family, my writing, gardening, and photography. The days are too short to waste time on my phone. I’m not adept at it, so I’m sure it took way more time for me than it takes you. 🙂
      Truly, I always enjoyed your posts! You are so creative and active; it was always a joy to see what you were doing. I hope you and your dear cats will continue to be safe and well, Carolina. I have always appreciated your kindness towards me and my writing. Please keep in touch!
      Gentle peace, Kitty

  3. I know what you mean about wanting to scream at times! It does get frustrating at times! I loved your pictures, especially the magical one of the trail. I must say, I too stared transfixed for a moment when I saw that picture of you, then I too laughed! Wow, what an adventure. Love and hugs to one and all.xxxx

  4. Pretty hysterical, after I was home! Such a mess. It’s called stick weed and unless some part of it cures disease, I hate it. Saved the old, huge sweatshirt, lost the old huge pants…my comfy gardening clothes. Oh, well. It was an unexpected adventure! 🙂

    Love you for visiting and taking time to comment. 🙂 xoxo, Kitty

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